Business

Morrisons hit by massive shareholder revolt over boss’s £1.7m bonus

Morrisons hit by massive shareholder revolt over boss’s £1.7m bonus when earnings have halved within the pandemic



Morrisons was yesterday hit by one of many greatest shareholder revolts in UK company historical past.

More than 70 per cent of shareholders rejected the choice handy chief government Dave Potts, 63, an enormous bonus after revenue halved within the pandemic.

The investor revolt follows a year of job losses, dividend cuts and unprecedented taxpayer assist at Morrisons.

Revolt: More than 70 per cent of shareholders rejected the choice handy chief government Dave Potts (pictured) a£1.7m bonus following a year of job losses, dividend cuts at Morrisons

Potts obtained the utmost £1.7million bonus, regardless of earnings falling to £165million from £435million the year earlier than. 

He was additionally given stock value £1.4million, which the company has argued he deserved after main the grocery store by way of the disaster.

The board upgraded his payout by stripping out the £290million price of the pandemic when calculating his rewards, which pushed his bonus as much as 200 per cent of wage, and handed him a complete pay packet of £4.2million.

The grocer mentioned: ‘Morrisons carried out exceptionally effectively for the nation throughout the first year of Covid with the executives broadly recognised for his or her management, readability, decisiveness, compassion and pace of each decision-making and execution.

‘It is a matter of honest remorse to the committee that it clearly has not been in a position to persuade a majority of shareholders – or the proxy voting businesses – that this was the appropriate plan of action.’

Shareholder advisory group Glass Lewis had mentioned the changes have been ‘not supportable’ whereas ISS mentioned it had ‘severe issues’.

Morrisons had been lauded for handing again £230million in business charges aid. The shareholder vote is advisory, which means it’s beneath no obligation to chop the pay.

The revolt is without doubt one of the largest at a UK public company, outstripping the 65 per cent of shareholders who rejected Persimmon boss Jeff Fairburn’s £75million in 2018, and on a par with the backlash towards Royal Mail’s Rico Back the identical year.

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